Convert Serum Calcium to Ionized Calcium

Total serum calcium comprises three major forms: free ionized calcium (about 50-55% of total); protein bound (about 35-45% of total). most of the protein-bound calcium is bound to albumin (80%, with the rest bound to globulins), likely to imidazole groups.; complexed with anions such as bicarbonate, citrate, lactate, and phosphate (about 5-10% of total).. Hypercalcemia, also spelled hypercalcaemia, is a high calcium (ca 2+) level in the blood serum. the normal range is 2.1–2.6 mmol/l (8.8–10.7 mg/dl, 4.3–5.2 meq/l), with levels greater than 2.6 mmol/l defined as hypercalcemia. those with a mild increase that has developed slowly typically have no symptoms. in those with greater levels or rapid onset, symptoms may include abdominal pain. The key to making the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is repeated measures of 1) serum calcium, 2) ionized calcium, 3) pth. measure them weekly for 2 or 3 weeks and the diagnosis will be clear in almost all cases. adults over 30 live in the 9’s, not the 10’s..

Serum ionized calcium may be falsely high when collected in serum separator tubes. there is simultaneous measurement of ph, which affects the binding of calcium to protein in an inverse manner. an increase in ph is accompanied by a decrease in ionized calcium. serum samples collected and handled in anaerobic conditions provide the best results. Hypercalcemia, also spelled hypercalcaemia, is a high calcium (ca 2+) level in the blood serum. the normal range is 2.1–2.6 mmol/l (8.8–10.7 mg/dl, 4.3–5.2 meq/l), with levels greater than 2.6 mmol/l defined as hypercalcemia. those with a mild increase that has developed slowly typically have no symptoms. in those with greater levels or rapid onset, symptoms may include abdominal pain. Serum levels expressed in milligrams can be converted to millimoles per liter by multiplying by 0.323. to convert to milliequivalents, multiply the concentration in millimoles by the valence (1.8 at ph of 7.40). although early phosphate retention causes a decrease in ionized calcium, leading to increased parathyroid hormone and initiation.

The total calcium level can be corrected for low albumin levels by adding 0.8 mg per dl (0.20 mmol per l) to the total serum calcium level for every 1.0 g per dl (10 g per l) by which the serum. Serum ionized calcium may be falsely high when collected in serum separator tubes. there is simultaneous measurement of ph, which affects the binding of calcium to protein in an inverse manner. an increase in ph is accompanied by a decrease in ionized calcium. serum samples collected and handled in anaerobic conditions provide the best results. Calcium, ionized, whole blood. cord blood. 5 to 6 mg/dl. newborn 3 to 24 hours. 4.3 to 5.1 mg/dl. c to convert triglyceride results to si units, divide value by 88.6. serum lipid concentrations by age and gender. males (mg/dl) females (mg/dl) 5 to 9 years. 10 to 14 years. 15 to 19 years. 5 to 9 years..

Normal calcium levels in a healthy adult should fall between 8.8-10.5 in mg/dl and 2.25-2.625 in mmol/l. a lower than normal calcium level is called hypocalcemia, while the state of higher than usual calcium levels is known as hypercalcemia.. children can have lower and higher physiological calcium levels than adults (a broader range) because their bodies use calcium more intensively to grow. Serum calcium levels and hence the body content are controlled by parathyroid hormone (pth), calcitonin, and vitamin d. an imbalance in any of these modulators leads to alterations of the body and serum calcium levels. increases in serum pth or vitamin d are usually associated with hypercalcemia.. Serum levels expressed in milligrams can be converted to millimoles per liter by multiplying by 0.323. to convert to milliequivalents, multiply the concentration in millimoles by the valence (1.8 at ph of 7.40). although early phosphate retention causes a decrease in ionized calcium, leading to increased parathyroid hormone and initiation.